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USS Dallas (DD-199)

USS Dallas (DD-199)

USS Dallas (DD-199)

USS Dallas (DD-199) was a Clemson class destroyer that took part in Operation Torch, the invasion of Sicily and the Salerno landings, as well as performing escort duties.

The Dallas was named after Alexander J. Dallas, a US Naval Officer who fought in the War of 1812, founded the Pensacola Navy Yard, then commanded the West India Squadron and finally the Pacific Squadron.

The Dallas was laid down at Newport News on 25 November 1918, launched on 31 May 1919 and commissioned on 29 October 1920. She was based at Charleston, South Carolina, and operated along the East Coast, before being placed out of commission at Philadelphia on 26 June 1922.

Unlike many of her sister-ships, the Dallas didn’t spend long out of service. Instead she was recommissioned on 14 April 1925, and remained in service almost continuously until 1945 (with one short break in 1939).

Between 14 April 1925 and June 1927 her captain was Carl Townsend Osburn, who was the most successful American Olympian until the 1970s. She served with a number of destroyer squadrons, and as the flagship of Squadrons 9, 7 and 1. During the period between 1925 and 1931 she was based on the East Coast and in the Caribbean, and took part in the normal US Navy routine of summer exercises off the US East Coast and winter exercises in the Caribbean. She also spent some time as an experimental ship at the Naval Torpedo Station, Newport, Rhode Island.

In January-March 1932 the Dallas moved to the west coast and a new base at San Diego. She was based on the west coast for most of the next six years, taking part in exercises, and visits to Hawaii and Alaska (including a trip to Alaska in 1937 alongside the Long (DD-209) and Wasmuth (DD-338)). She returned to the East Coast in 1934 to take part in the Presidential Review of the Fleet at New York in June 1934 and spent most of the rest of the year taking part in exercises off the East Coast and Caribbean, before returning to San Diego in November.

The Dallas was based in the Canal Zone from May to November 1938, where she supported Submarine Squadron 3 and made a series of visits to local ports. At the end of the year she moved to Philadelphia, where she was decommissioned on 23 March 1939.

Within a few months war had broken out in Europe, and the US Navy began to expand once again. The Dallas was recommissioned on 25 September 1939, and became flagship of Destroyer Squadron 41 then Squadron 30 in the Atlantic Fleet. She was based along the Atlantic Coast, and spent 1940 and the first part of 1941 taking part in training exercises.

This ended on 7 July 1941 when she departed for Argentia, Newfound. Between 11 July 1941 and 10 March 1942 she operated from Argentia and Halifax, escorting convoys to Reykjavik and later to Londonderry. Anyone who served on her between 10 July-31 July, 18 August-18 October or 28 October-28 November 1941 qualified for the American Defense Service Medal.

The American entry into the war brought the war to the US East Coast. Between 1 April and 3 October 1942 the Dallas helped escort coastal shipping moving between New York, Norfolk, Florida, Texas, Cuba, Bermuda and into the Caribbean. She was then allocated to the forces taking part in Operation Torch, and departed from Norfolk on 25 October 1942 to join Task Force 34.

During Operation Torch she was used to land 75 men from a U.S. Army Raider battalion at Lyautey airport. This involved a dangerous voyage up a shallow river, the Wadi or Oued Sebou, piloted by René Malavergne, a French civilian pilot who had been imprisoned by the Vichy French but escaped and reached Britain. The Dallas was under fire for much of the run and had to cope with shallow water, sunken ships and other obstacles, as well as cutting her way through a cable across the river, before she finally landed her troops close to the airport. By 10.30am on 10 November the first P-40s had flown into Lyautey airfield from the escort carriers out at sea. The Dallas was awarded a Presidential Unit Citation for this exploit, while Malavergne became the first foreign civilian to be awarded the Navy Cross.

The Dallas didn’t stay in North Africa for long after Operation Torch, and departed for the US on 15 November. In the first half of 1943 she spent most of her time on escort duties between Norfolk, New York and New London, breaking the routine with a trip to Gibraltar between 3 March and 14 April.

In May 1943 she moved back to the Mediterranean, ready to take part in the invasion of Sicily. She reached Oran on 23 may and spent some time patrolling off the North African coast. On 9 July she joined Task Force 81, and formed part of the screen during the landings at Scoglitti on Sicily (10-12 July). This was followed by another period of escort and patrol duties.

On 7 September she joined part of the escort of a convoy heading for Salerno, and on 9 September she screened the transport group landing there. After two days off Salerno she joined a south-bound convoy, picking up two downed British airmen on the way. She escorted reinforcements heading by sea to Salerno, then remained in the Mediterranean until 11 December, when she departed for the US East Coast.

After undergoing an overhaul, the Dallas escorted two convoys heading for North Africa between 23 February and 9 June 1944. On 11 May she helped fight off an Axis air attack on the second convoy, claiming one enemy aircraft.

The Dallas then returned to the US East Coast, where she performed a mix of convoy escort and training duties. On 31 March 1945 she was renamed as the USS Alexander Dallas, to free up her original name for the new cruiser USS Dallas (CA-140).

After the end of the war in Europe the Dallas was surplus to requirements. On 7 June 1945 she moved to Philadelphia, where she was decommissioned on 28 July 1945. She was sold for scrap on 30 November 1945.

The Dallas received four battle stars during the Second World War, for Operation Torch, the invasion of Sicily, the Salerno landings and the defence of Convoy UGS-40 on 11 May 1944.

Displacement (standard)

1,190t

Displacement (loaded)

1,308t

Top Speed

35kts
35.51kts at 24,890shp at 1,107t on trial (Preble)

Engine

2-shaft Westinghouse geared turbines
4 boilers
27,000shp (design)

Range

2,500nm at 20kts (design)

Armour - belt

- deck

Length

314ft 4in

Width

30ft 10.5in

Armaments

Four 4in/ 50 guns
One 3in/23 AA gun
Twelve 21in torpedoes in four triple mountings
Two depth charge tracks
One Y-Gun depth charge projector

Crew complement

114

Launched

31 May 1919

Commissioned

29 October 1920

Decommissioned

28 July 1945

Sold for scrap

30 November 1945


Pre-World War II

Dallas operated on the United States East Coast, participating in exercises and maneuvers from her base at Charleston, South Carolina. She arrived at Philadelphia on 12 April 1922 and was decommissioned there on 26 June.

Recommissioned on 14 April 1925, Dallas served with various destroyer squadrons, acting as flagship for Squadrons 9, 7, and 1. Until 1931, she cruised along the U.S. East Coast and in the Caribbean, engaging in gunnery exercises, battle torpedo practice, fleet maneuvers, and fleet problems participating in joint United States Army-U.S. Navy exercises training members of the United States Naval Reserve and serving as experimental ship at the Naval Torpedo Station, Newport, Rhode Island. [1]

On 9 January 1932, Dallas departed Charleston, South Carolina, bound for the United States West Coast, arriving at San Diego, California, on 21 March 1932. She operated along the U.S. West Coast and in the Hawaiian Islands, conducting force practice and tactical exercises and participating in combined fleet exercises. [1]

Dallas departed San Diego on 9 April 1934 for the Presidential Review of the Fleet in June 1934 at New York City and tactical exercises on the U.S. East Coast and in the Caribbean. Returning to San Diego on 9 November 1934, Dallas continued to operate in the Pacific Ocean until 1938, cruising to Hawaii and Alaska. [1]

Dallas operated in the Panama Canal Zone area between May and November 1938, visiting ports of the Republic of Panama rendering service to Submarine Squadron 3 and making a good-will call at Buenaventura, Colombia. On 17 November 1938 she weighed anchor for the U.S. East Coast, arriving at Philadelphia on 23 November 1938. She again was placed out of commission on 23 March 1939. [1]

World War II

With the outbreak of World War II in Europe on 1 September 1939, Dallas was recommissioned on 25 September 1939 and assigned to the United States Atlantic Fleet, serving as flagship for Destroyer Squadrons 41 and 30. She patrolled along the U.S. East Coast and conducted training exercises until 7 July 1941, when she got underway for Naval Station Argentia in the Dominion of Newfoundland, where she arrived on 11 July 1941. Between 11 July 1941 and 10 March 1942 she patrolled between Argentia and Halifax, Nova Scotia, and escorted convoys to Reykjavík, Iceland, and Derry, Northern Ireland. [1]

From 1 April 1942 to 3 October, Dallas escorted coastal shipping from New York and Norfolk, Virginia to Florida, Texas, Cuba, Bermuda, and ports in the Caribbean. On 25 October she cleared Norfolk to rendezvous with Task Force 34 bound for the Operation Torch amphibious landings in North Africa. Dallas was to carry a U.S. Army Raider battalion, and land them up the narrow, shallow, obstructed Sebou River to take a strategic airfield near Port Lyautey, French Morocco. On 10 November 1942 she began her run up the river under the guidance of Rene Malevergne, a civilian pilot who would later become the first foreign civilian to receive the Navy Cross. Under cannon and small arms fire throughout her voyage up the river, she plowed her way through mud and shallow water, narrowly missing many sunken ships and other obstructions, and sliced through a cable crossing the river to land her troops safely just off the airfield. Her outstanding success in completing this mission with its many unexpected complications won her the Presidential Unit Citation. On 15 November 1942, she departed the African coast for Boston, Massachusetts, arriving there 26 November 1942. [1]

Dallas had convoy duty between Norfolk, New York, and New London, Connecticut — also making one voyage to Gibraltar from 3 March to 14 April 1943 — until 9 May 1943, when she departed Norfolk for Oran, Algeria, arriving there on 23 May 1943. She patrolled off the North African coast, then on 9 July 1943 joined Task Force 81 for screening duty during the Battle of Gela from 10 to 12 July during Operation Husky, the Allied invasion of Sicily. [2] She returned to convoy and patrol duties until 7 September 1943, when she joined the escort for a convoy bound for the amphibious landings on the mainland of Italyin Operation Avalanche. Dallas screened the transport group during the landings at Salerno on 9 September 1943, and joined a southbound convoy on 11 September 1943, rescuing two downed British airmen on her way to Oran. She escorted reinforcements to Salerno, then served on escort and patrol in the Mediterranean until 11 December 1943, when she got underway for the U.S. East Coast, arriving at Philadelphia on 24 December 1943. [1]

Following a thorough overhaul at Charleston, South Carolina, Dallas escorted two convoys to North Africa between 23 February and 9 June 1944. On the second voyage, the escorts came under attack by enemy torpedo planes on 11 May 1944, but successfully defended the convoy Dallas shot down at least one plane, and damaged others. She served on the U.S. East Coast on various training and convoy assignments. On 31 March 1945, her name was changed to Alexander Dallas to avoid confusion with the planned heavy cruiser USS   Dallas   (CA-150) , named after Dallas, Texas, rather than Alexander J. Dallas. [1]

Arriving at the Philadelphia Navy Yard on 7 June 1945, Alexander Dallas was decommissioned there on 28 July 1945. Stricken from the Navy Register on 13 August 1945, she was sold on 30 November 1945 to the Boston Metals Company of Baltimore, Maryland, for scrapping for US$8,700.00. [1]


USS Dallas (DD-199) - History

The Dallas (SSN 700) is 13th Los Angeles-class attack submarine and the first U.S. Navy ship to bear the name of the City of Dallas, Texas. The keel was laid down on October 9, 1976. She was christened and launched on April 28, 1979, by Mrs. William P. Clements, Jr., and was commissioned on July 18, 1981, with Capt. Donald R. Ferrier in command. SSN 700 is the first submarine of the Los Angeles-class to be originally built with an all-digital fire control (tracking and weapon) system and sonar system.

August 27, 1981 USS Dallas damaged her lower rudder when she ran aground while approaching the Atlantic Underwater Test and Evaluation Center site at Andros Island, Bahamas. The submarine worked herself free after several hours and returned on the surface to Groton, Conn., for minor repairs to its forward group of main balast tanks and the rudder.

October 19, SSN 700 commenced a three-week Anti-Submarine Warfare Exercise (ASWEX) 1-82. Completed its first Operational Reactor Safeguard Examination (ORSE) on Nov. 24.

December 18, Cmdr. Warren A. Rawson, Jr., relieved Capt. Donald R. Ferrier as CO of the Dallas.

January 2, USS Dallas departed Naval Submarine Base New London for a five-month Post Shakedown Availability (PSA) at Newport News, Va.

In Fall 1982, the Los Angeles-class attack submarine entered the dry-dock four times for emergent repairs to its secondary propulsion motor.

December 3, USS Dallas departed Groton, Conn., for its maiden deployment.

April 29, 1983 SSN 700 returned to homeport after a five-month Mediterranean deployment. The Dallas made port calls to La Maddalena, Italy Naples, Italy and Toulon, France.

In early December, USS Dallas visited Galveston, Texas. Commenced a two-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) in January 1984.

May 18, USS Dallas departed homeport for a seven-month Indian Ocean deployment. She circumnavigated the globe by transiting the Cape of Good Hope and Panama Canal Port calls to Diego Garcia, British Indian Ocean Teritory HMAS Stirling and Albany, Australia.

February 4, 1985 Cmdr. Francis W. LaCroix relieved Cmdr. Warren A. Rawson, Jr., as the 3rd commanding officer of Dallas.

In June, USS Dallas entered the dry-dock for emergent repairs to its secondary propulsion motor. In September, the sub supported CNO project at Exuma Sound range off Bahamas and made a port call to Port Everglades, Fla.

January 2?, 1986 The Dallas departed Groton for a four-month Mediterranean deployment.

In October, the Los Angeles-class attack submarine entered the Electric Boat Shipyard in Groton for a two-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

In January 1987, USS Dallas visited St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. Entered the dry-dock in late January to corect a material problem with the sonar dome Underway from March through April for a major ASW exercise in the western Atlantic Underway for PCO operations in May.

June 18, Cmdr. Carl B. Dunn relieved Cmdr. Francis W. LaCroix as CO of the Dallas.

In September, USS Dallas participated in a large NATO exercise Ocean Safari in the North Atlantic and SHAREM 71 off the coast of Norway. Port visit to Brest, France, in early October.

From January through April 1988, SSN 700 conducted Pre-Overseas Movement (POM) upkeep, workups and certification.

From May through July, USS Dallas was deployed to North Atlantic. In September, she participated in Operation Fertile Virgo and arrived in Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine, for an 11-month Depot Modernization Period (DMP) Returned to Groton in September 1989 Participated in ASWEX 1-90 in November Underway in support of CNO project in December and January, to evaluate the new BQQ-5D Sonar System.

August 7, 1990 USS Dallas departed homeport for a scheduled six-month Mediterranean deployment.

December 18, 1992 Cmdr. John J. Schwanz relieved Cmdr. Richard P. Terpstra as the 6th CO of Dallas.

From October through December 1993, the Los Angeles-class attack submarine was deployed to North Atlantic. Underway for acoustic trials at Exuma Sound in March 1994 Underway for Atlantic Ocean deployment from June through September Commenced a two-month SRA in October Deployed again from April through July 1995.

August 1, Cmdr. John C. Kamp relieved Cmdr. John J. Schwanz as commanding officer of the USS Dallas.

In September 1995, USS Dallas entered the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittrery, Maine, for a two-and-a-half year Engineered Refueling Overhaul (ERO).

April 4, 2000 USS Dallas departed NSB New London for a scheduled six-month Mediterranean deployment. This will be the first ever Dry Deck Shelter (DDS) deployment of an Los Angleles-class attack submarine. DDS can allow special operations forces including Navy SEALs to deploy undetected from deployed submarines.

August 30, USS Dallas conducted the first ever swap-out of the DDS for a Deep Submergence Rescue Vehicle (DSRV) in a foreign port.

September 7, SSN 700 arrived again in Aksaz Naval Base in Turkey for a brief port call after supporting the NATO triennial major submarine escape and rescue (SMER) exercise Sorbet Royal 2000.

From November 14-17, the Dallas was underway in support of USS Augusta (SSN 710) POMCERT in the Narragansett Bay Op. Area. Underway in support of USS Seawolf (SSN 21) operational evaluation from Nov. 28- Dec. 11 Underway for local operations from Feb. 1-12, 2001 Commenced a two-month SRA on March 8 Underway for ISE from May 22-26.

From June 11-29, USS Dallas was underway for Tactical Readiness Evaluation (TRE). Inport Port Canaveral, Fla., from June 23-26 Underway in support of USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) BG's Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) from July 30- Aug. 23 Underway for ORSE from Aug. 24-26 Underway for local operations from Sept. 5-7 Underway for ISE from Dec. 8-21 Brief stop in Port Canaveral on Dec. 17.

April 4, 2002 USS Dallas departed Naval Submarine Base New London for a scheduled deployment.

July 19, 2004 SSN 700 departed Souda Bay, Crete, Greece, after a brief port visit. She is currently on a six-month deployment in support of the Global War on Terrorism.

July 29, 2006 USS Dallas, commanded by Cmdr Gard Clark, departed Groton, Conn., for a scheduled Middle East deployment.

September 21, The Los Angeles-class attack submarine departed Souda Bay, Crete, after a three-day port call.

November 11, SSN 700 departed Manama, Bahrain, following a week-long port visit that allowed the crew to conduct mid-deployment maintenance and take part in some well-earned liberty.

May 8, 2008 USS Dallas pulled to Navy Support Facility Diego Garcia to conduct a Voyage Repair Period.

August 4, The Dallas moored at HMNB Gibraltar, British overseas teritory, for a routine port call.

August 21, USS Dallas returned to homeport after a six-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet Areas of Responsibility (AoR).

October 28, The Dallas recently concluded an eight-day torpedo exercise TACDEVEX 08-08, in the Cape Cod operation areas, with USS Nicholas (FFG 47) and the Dutch submarine HNLMS Walrus (SSK S802).

December 3, SSN 700 arrived at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard for an Engineered Refueling Overhaul (ERO).

August 3, 2009 Cmdr. George Arnold relieved Cmdr. David Roberts as CO of USS Dallas during a change-of-command ceremony at Squalus Memorial Park in Kittery, Maine.

February 27, 2011 The Dallas recently participated in Anti-Submarine Warfare Integration Training Initiative (ASWITI) off the coast of Florida, with the ships from Destroyer Squadron 24, in preparation for the upcoming deployment.

September 8, USS Dallas arrived at Navy Support Faclity (NSF) Diego Garcia, British Indian Ocean Teritory, to get tender support from USS Emory S. Land (AS 39).

November 26, SSN 700 recently moored at Toulon Naval Base, France, for a routine port call.

December 14, USS Dallas returned to Naval Submarine Base New London after a six-month deployment in the Central Command AoO. The crew made port calls in Rota, Spain Manama, Bahrain Fujaihra and Jebel Ali, U.A.E.

February 23, 2012 Cmdr. Jack E. Houdeshell relieved Cmdr. George Arnold as commanding officer of SSN 700 during a ceremony at the NSB New London's Shepherd of the Sea chapel. The Los Angeles-class attack submarine recently participated in a multinational amphibious assault exercise Bold Aligator 2012.

April 25, USS Dallas moored outboard the USS Gettysburg (CG 64) in Port Everglades, Fla., for a five-day port visit to participate in the 22nd Broward Navy Days' Fleet Week.

May 3, 2013 USS Dallas departed Groton, Conn., for its last major deployment.

July 1, The Los Angeles-class attack submarine moored at Khalifa Bin Salman Port (KBSP) in Hidd, Bahrain, for an eight-day port call Inport KBSP again from Aug. 13-19 Returned to Mediterranean on Aug. 25.

September 24, USS Dallas is currently participating in an Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) exercise with the Royal Navy&rsquos Response Force Task Group (RFTG) ships and USS Bulkeley (DDG 84), in the Gulf of Oman.

October 6, SSN 700 arrived in Diego Garcia, British Indian Ocean Teritory, for a routine port call.

November 25, USS Dallas returned to homeport after a nearly seven-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet AoR. She steamed more than 34,000 nautical miles and also made port calls to Spain and Portugal.

From January 26-29, 2014, the Dallas participated in Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) exercise Atlantic Shield with the Canadian Navy ships HMCS Windsor (SSK 877) and HMCS Halifax (FFH 330).

July 21, USS Dallas moored at CIAMA Submarine Naval Base in Rio de Janeiro for a week-long port visit, in conjunction with the Brazilian Navy Submarine Centennial celebration, before participating in exercises with the HMS Ambush (S120), FS Amethyste (S 605) and Brazilian Navy subs.

November 14, Cmdr. Edward K. Byers relieved Cmdr. Jack E. Houdeshell as CO of USS Dallas during a change-of-command ceremony on board the sub at Naval Submarine Base New London.

February 2, 2016 Capt. Oliver T. Lewis, Commander, Submarine Squadron (SUBRON) 12 relieved of duty Cmdr. Edward Byers due to a "loss of confidence in his ability to command." Capt. Jack E. Houdeshell, deputy commander of SUBRON 4, assumed temporary command of the SSN 700.

April ?, USS Dallas departed Naval Submarine Base New London for a scheduled deployment.

April 21, The Dallas departed Her Majesty Naval Base (HMNB) Clyde in Faslane, Scotland, after a brief port call following its participation in a biannual multinational exercise Joint Warrior 16-1 Transited the Suez Canal southbound on May ?.

August 9, SSN 700 moored outboard the USS Frank Cable (AS 40) at Berth 58, Quay 9 in Port of Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a two-week Fleet Maintenance Availability (FMAV) Transited the Strait of Hormuz southbound on Aug. 23.

From August 25-29, USS Dallas participated in a bilateral Ship Anti-Submarine Warfare Readiness and Evaluation Measurement (SHAREM) exercise in the North Arabian Sea.

October 30, USS Dallas transited the Suez Canal northbound, escorted by USS Mason (DDG 87).

November 6, The Dallas recently moored at Milhaud Pier 5W in Toulon Naval Base, France, for a liberty port call.

November 22, USS Dallas moored at Pier 8S on NSB New London following an extended seven-and-a-half month deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet AoR. The sub traveled 37,000 nautical miles and also made port calls to Brest, France Hidd, Bahrain and Duqm, Oman.

December 15, Cmdr. David I. Kaiser relieved Capt. Jack E. Houdeshell as the last CO of USS Dallas, during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Submarine Base New London's Shepherd of the Sea chapel.

February 22, 2017 The Dallas moored at Trident Wharf in Port Canaveral, Fla., for a brief stop.

March 24, USS Dallas departed Groton for the last time en route to Bremerton, Wash., to commence a year-long inactivation process at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard.

April 9, SSN 700 moored at Trident Wharf in Port Canaveral for a two-day port call Transited the Panama Canal southbound on April 17 Moored at November Pier South on Naval Base Point Loma in San Diego, Calif., from April 28- May 2 and May 8-11 Moored at N/S/I Mike Pier from May 1?-19.

May 22, USS Dallas moored at Berth 4, Delta Pier on Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton Moved to Berth 2 on May 2?.

June 15, The Dallas is inactivated and placed in Reserve (Stand Down) status.

December 5, USS Dallas held a decommissioning ceremony at Trident Ballroom on Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, after more than 36 years of active service.


USS Dallas (DD-199) - History

Alexander J. Dallas, born 15 May 1791 in Philadelphia, Pa., entered the Navy as a midshipman 22 November 1805. He served with distinction in the War of 1812, the operations against Algiers in 1815, and in the suppression of piracy in the West Indies. He established and commanded the Pensacola Navy Yard from 1832 to 1843. On 16 July 1835 he was ordered to additional duty in command of the West India Squadron in supported General Scott during the war with the Seminole Indians in Florida, rendering such efficient service that the Government gratefully named a fort after him on the eastern coast of Florida. Commanding Pacific Squadron, Captain Dallas died at Callao, Peru, 3 June 1844 in the sloop Vandalia. DD-199 was named in his honor.

Texas. CA-140 and CA-150 were to have honored Sallas,
dp. 1,190, 1. 314'5", b. 31'9", dr. 9'3", s. cpl. 101 a. 4 4", 4 21" tt. cl. Clemson)

Dallas (DD-199) was launched 31 May 1919 by Newport News Shipbuilding Co., Newport News, VA., sponsored by Miss W. D. Strong, great grand-daughter of Captain Dallas and commissioned 29 October 1920, Lieutenant E. H. Roach in temporary command. Lieutenant A. R. Early assumed command 10 November 1920.

Dallas cruised on the east coast, participating in exercises and maneuvers from her base at Charleston S .C. She arrived at Philadelphia 12 April 1922 and was placed out of commission there 26 June. Recommissioned 14 April 1925 Dallas served with various destroyer squadrons, acting as flagship for Squadrons 9 and 1. Until 1931 she cruised on the east coast and the Caribbean, engaging in gunnery exercises, battle torpedo practice, fleet maneuvers and problems participAting in joint Army-Navy exercises, training members of the Naval Reserve and serving as experimental ship at the Naval Torpedo Station, Newport, R.I.

On 9 January 1932 Dallas sailed from Charleston,S.C., for the west coast, arriving at San Diego, 21 March. She operated along the west coast and in the Hawaiian Islands, conducting force practice and tactical exercises and participating in combined fleet exercises.

Dallas sailed from San Diego 9 April 1934 for the Presidential Review of the Fleet in June 1934 at New York City, and tactical exercises on the east coast and in the Caribbean. Returning to San Diego 9 November,Dallas continued to operate in the Pacific until 1938, cruising to Hawaii and Alaska.

Dallas operated in the Canal Zone area between May and November 1938, visiting ports of the Republic of Panama rendering service to Submarine Squadron 3 and making a good-will call at Buenaventura, Colombia. On 17 November she weighed anchor for the east coast arriving at Philadelphia 6 days later. She was again placed out of commission 23 March 1939.

With the outbreak of World War II in Europe, Dallas was recommissioned 26 September 1939 and assigned he Atlantic Fleet, serving as flagship for Destroyer Squadrons 41 and 30. She patrolled the Atlantic coast and conducted training exercises until 7 July 1941 when she got underway for Argentia, Newfoundland, arriving, days later. Between 11 July 1941 and 10 March 1942 she patrolled between Argentia and Halifax and escorted convoys to Reykjavik, Iceland, and Londonderry, Northern Ireland.

From 1 April 1942 to 3 October, Dallas escorted coastal shipping from New York and Norfolk to Florida, Texas, Cuba, Bermuda, and ports in the Caribbean. On 25 October she cleared Norfolk to rendezvous with TF 34 bound for the invasion landings on North Africa. Dallas was to carry a U.S. Army Raider battalion, and land them up the narrow, shallow, obstructed river to take a strategic airport near Port Lyautey, French Morocco. On 10 November she began her run up the Oued Sebou under the masterful guidance of Rene Malavergne, a civilian pilot who was to be the first foreign civilian to receive the Navy Cross. Under fire by cannon and small arms during the entire run, she plowed her way through mud and shallow water, narrowly missing the many sunken ships and other obstructions, and sliced through a cable crossing the river, to land her troops safely just off the airport. Her brilliant success in completing this mission with its many unexpected complications won her the Presidential Unit Citation. On 16 November she departed the African coast for Boston, arriving 26 November.

Dallas had convoy duty between Norfolk, New York and New London, making one voyage to Gibraltar from 3 March to 14 April 1943, until 9 May when she departed Norfolk for Oran, Algeria, arriving 23 May. She patrolled off the North African coast, then on 9 July joined TF 81 for screening duty during the invasion of Scoglitti, Sicily, from 10 to 12 July. She returned to convoy and patrol duties until 7 September when she joined the escort for a convoy bound for the invasion of the Italian mainland. Dallas screened the transport group during the landings at Salerno 9 September, and joined a south-bound convoy 2 days later, rescuing two downed British airmen on her way to Oran. She escorted reinforcements to Salerno, then served on escort and patrol in the Mediterranean until 11 December when she got underway for the east coast, arriving, at Philadelphia on Christmas Eve.

Following a thorough overhaul at Charleston, S.C, Dallas escorted two convoys to North Africa between 23 February and 9 June 1944. On the second voyage the escorts came under attack by enemy torpedo planes on 11 May but successfully defended the convoy Dallas accounted for at least one plane, and damaging others. She served on the east coast on various training and convoy assignments until 7 Juno 1945 when she reported to Philadelphia. Her name was changed to Alexander Dallas 31 March to avoid confusion with the cruiser Dallas then under construction. Alexander Dallas was decommissioned 28 July 1946 and sold for scrap 30 November 1946.

In addition to her Presidential Unit Citation Dallas received four battle stars for World War II service.


Contents

Dallas cruised on the east coast, participating in exercises and maneuvers from her base at Charleston, South Carolina. She arrived at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 12 April 1922 and was decommissioned there 26 June. Recommissioned on 14 April 1925, Dallas served with various destroyer squadrons, acting as flagship for Squadrons 9, 7, and 1. Until 1931, she cruised on the east coast and in the Caribbean, engaging in gunnery exercises, battle torpedo practice, fleet maneuvers and problems participating in joint Army-Navy exercises training members of the Naval Reserve and serving as experimental ship at the Naval Torpedo Station, Newport, Rhode Island.

On 9 January 1932, Dallas sailed from Charleston, for the west coast, arriving at San Diego, California, 21 March. She operated along the west coast and in the Hawaiian Islands, conducting force practice and tactical exercises and participating in combined fleet exercises.

Dallas sailed from San Diego 9 April 1934 for the Presidential Review of the Fleet in June 1934 at New York City, and tactical exercises on the east coast and in the Caribbean. Returning to San Diego 9 November, Dallas continued to operate in the Pacific until 1938, cruising to Hawaii and Alaska.

Dallas operated in the Panama Canal Zone area between May and November 1938, visiting ports of the Republic of Panama rendering service to Submarine Squadron 3 and making a good-will call at Buenaventura, Colombia. On 17 November she weighed anchor for the east coast, arriving at Philadelphia 6 days later. She was again placed out of commission 23 March 1939.

With the outbreak of World War II in Europe, Dallas was recommissioned 25 September 1939 and assigned to the Atlantic Fleet, serving as flagship for Destroyer Squadrons 41 and 30. She patrolled the Atlantic coast and conducted training exercises until 7 July 1941 when she got underway for NS Argentia, Newfoundland, arriving 4 days later. Between 11 July 1941 and 10 March 1942 she patrolled between Argentia and Halifax, Nova Scotia and escorted convoys to Reykjavík, Iceland, and Derry, Northern Ireland.

From 1 April 1942 to 3 October, Dallas escorted coastal shipping from New York and Norfolk, Virginia to Florida, Texas, Cuba, Bermuda, and ports in the Caribbean. On 25 October she cleared Norfolk to rendezvous with TP 34 bound for the invasion landings on North Africa. Dallas was to carry a U.S. Army Raider battalion, and land them up the narrow, shallow, obstructed river to take a strategic airport near Port Lyautey, French Morocco. On 10 November, she began her run up the Sebou River under the guidance of Rene Malavergne, a civilian pilot (who would later be the first foreign civilian to receive the Navy Cross). Under cannon and small arms fire throughout, she plowed her way through mud and shallow water, narrowly missing the many sunken ships and other obstructions, and sliced through a cable crossing the river, to land her troops safely just off the airport. Her outstanding success in completing this mission with its many unexpected complications won her the Presidential Unit Citation. On 15 November, she departed the African coast for Boston, Massachusetts, arriving 26 November.

Dallas had convoy duty between Norfolk, New York and New London, Connecticut making one voyage to Gibraltar from 3 March to 14 April 1943, until 9 May when she departed Norfolk for Oran, Algeria, arriving 23 May. She patrolled off the North African coast, then on 9 July joined TF 81 for screening duty during the Amphibious Battle of Gela, Sicily, from 10 to 12 July. [ 1 ] She returned to convoy and patrol duties until 7 September when she joined the escort for a convoy bound for the invasion of the Italian mainland. Dallas screened the transport group during the landings at Salerno 9 September, and joined a south-bound convoy 2 days later, rescuing two downed British airmen on her way to Oran. She escorted reinforcements to Salerno, then served on escort and patrol in the Mediterranean until 11 December when she got underway for the east coast, arriving at Philadelphia on Christmas Eve.

Following a thorough overhaul at Charleston, Dallas escorted two convoys to North Africa between 23 February and 9 June 1944. On the second voyage, the escorts came under attack by enemy torpedo planes on 11 May, but successfully defended the convoy Dallas shot down at least one plane, and damaged others. She served on the east coast on various training and convoy assignments until 7 June 1945, when she reported to Philadelphia. Her name was changed to Alexander Dallas 31 March to avoid confusion with cruiser Dallas, then under construction. Alexander Dallas was decommissioned 28 July 1945 and sold for scrap 30 November 1945.


Military Dependents

Growing up as military dependents, our family members were used to getting a crisp salute from the Military Police at the gate when we entered any Naval base. Showing our identification cards allowed us access to the Commissary where we bought our household groceries. The Base Exchange (BX) provided many of our back-to-school clothes and we often went to the Saturday matinee on the Navy base where movies were only ten cents.

As children, we took Judo Classes on the base and participated in tournaments against other students. The Navy was our world and most of our friends were also military dependents.


9 Things to Know About the History of Juneteenth

Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration honoring the end of slavery in the United States.

On June 19, 1865, Union General Gordon Granger led thousands of federal troops to Galveston, Texas to announce that the Civil War had ended, and slaves had been freed. Approximately 250,000 Texan slaves had no idea that their freedom had been secured by the government.

However, the history of freedom in this country can be tangled, and this is no exception.

Here are nine facts about the historical moment, and what led up to it.

1. You may recall Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation from elementary social studies classes. In the condensed version, many learn that this executive order meant immediate freedom for slaves throughout the nation. However, since the country was in the midst of the Civil War, those states that had seceded from the Union did not adhere to the Proclamation, and slaves in those states remained unfree.

2. Though much of the language in the Emancipation Proclamation suggests otherwise, Lincoln’s primary objective was not to ameliorate the lives of those in bondage. Rather, his intent was preserving the Union.

In August 1862, Horace Greely, the editor of the New York Tribune, published an editorial addressed to Lincoln pressuring his stance on slavery and urging him to abolish it. Lincoln responded in an open letter to Greely, published in the Tribune that same August:

“My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union and is not either to save or destroy Slavery,” Lincoln wrote. “What I do about Slavery and the colored race, I do because I believe it helps to save this Union. ”

3. Lincoln and the Union army used slavery as a political motive to justify strengthened military endeavors against the Confederacy. Black soldiers were able to fight for the Union when Lincoln passed the Proclamation. Though they faced discrimination and often performed menial roles because of presumed incompetence, they increased the Union army in size.

4. The Civil War ended in April of 1865. In June of that year, General Gordon Granger and his troops traveled to Galveston, Texas to announce “General Orders No. 3” It stated: “The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free.

5. Throughout the war, Texas was not as closely monitored as other battle states. For this reason, many slave owners went to Texas with their slaves. With its relatively negligible Union presence, slavery continued there for much longer. After the Emancipation Proclamation went into effect, slaves in wartorn states often escaped behind Union lines or fought on its behalf

6. The slaves who got the news were jubilant to hear of their freedom on Juneteenth. In the book, “Lone Star Pasts: Memory and History in Texas,” Felix Haywood, a former slave who gave a testimony about Juneteenth as part of a New Deal project recalled:

"The end of the war, it come jus’ like that—like you snap your fingers….Hallelujah broke out….Soldiers, all of a sudden, was everywhere—comin’ in bunches, crossin’, walkin’ and ridin’. Everyone was a-singin.’ We was all walkin’ on golden clouds….Everybody went wild. We was free. Just like that we was free.”

7. Freedom did not come at the “snap of a finger” for everyone in Texas. Some people who should’ve been freed continued to work through the harvest season because their masters withheld this announcement to reap more wages out of their slaves. This left many former slaves treated as though they were still in bondage.

In “Lone Star Pasts” Susan Merritt reported:

“Lots of Negroes were killed after freedom. bushwhacked, shot down while they were trying to get away. You could see lots of Negroes hanging from trees in Sabine bottom right after freedom."

8. In the 1870s, a group former slaves pooled $800 together through local churches to purchase ten acres of land and create Emancipation Park to host future Juneteenth celebrations in modern-day Houston.

9. In 1980 “Emancipation Day in Texas” became a legal state holiday in recognition of Juneteenth. However state offices do not completely close, as it is considered a "partial staffing holiday." Elsewhere, the holiday is also referred to as Emancipation Day, Freedom Day, and Black Independence Day.

Many continue to celebrate Juneteenth 151 years later. Throughout the nation people host cookouts, parades, and other gatherings to commemorate.


Family dynasty protects a ‘killer’ Kennedy

Environmentalist Robert F. Kennedy Jr. kept secret diaries that were found by his wife, Mary, who committed suicide last year in the midst of a contentious divorce. The Post, which was provided copies of the journals by a source, previously reported how the volumes detailed RFK’s “lust demons” while chronicling his sexual conquests with 37 women. Now, newly revealed entries show the family’s reaction to JFK Jr.’s death in 1999.

The tragic death of John F. Kennedy Jr. was marked by deep sorrow — and intense family bickering over the funerals before the bodies were even recovered, according to Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s secret diary.

The journal’s entries in the aftermath of the July 16, 1999, plane crash that killed Kennedy, 38, wife Carolyn Bessette, 33, and sister-in-law Lauren Bessette, 34, provide a rare eyewitness account of the intensely private scene at the Kennedy compound and the petty, tense squabbling over whether Carolyn deserved the royal Kennedy treatment.

Kennedy reports on a heated meeting in New York City, three days after the crash, during which other Kennedy family members tell Ann Freeman, Carolyn Bessette’s grieving mother, that JFK Jr. would be buried in the family plot in Brookline, Mass., and “that they could do with Carolyn as they pleased.”

The heart-wrenching drama of JFK Jr.’s death was one of many private family moments Kennedy chronicled in thick, red journals reviewed by The Post.

In mid-July 1999, the family was coming together at their Hyannis Port, Mass., retreat for the wedding of RFK Jr.’s sister Rory Kennedy, the youngest child of assassinated Sen. Robert F. Kennedy.

RFK Jr.’s wife had visited JFK Jr. and Bessette a week earlier and Bessette told her that her husband was “so depressed” because he was fighting with his sister, Caroline, over furniture at the Martha’s Vineyard home that once belonged to their mother and had been left to them when Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis died in 1994. JFK Jr. was in the process of buying out his sister’s share in the Red Gate Farm estate.

Kennedy notes that “John confided to me also about how hurt he was by Caroline’s actions.” (Last spring, Caroline Kennedy, who is about to be sworn in as the US ambassador to Japan, put part of the estate on the market for $45 million.)

Kennedy also mentions JFK Jr.’s struggles with George magazine, which he co-founded, and the uproar caused when he invited Hustler publisher Larry Flynt to join his table at that year’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner. Sen. Ted Kennedy had written nephew John a “disappointed letter” about the decision and “John was hurt by that because his family is so important.”

Kennedy doesn’t say anything about the marital troubles between John and Carolyn, strife that largely came to light after their deaths.

“Mary and I resolved we will go see them this weekend and spend a lot of time with them,” RFK Jr., now 59, wrote of his cousin, who was seven years his junior.

The couple stopped by JFK Jr.’s house in Hyannis Port before the wedding rehearsal dinner the next night, at 6 p.m., but he wasn’t there.

They went back at 9, 10 and 11:30 that night, Kennedy writes. A friend and the housekeeper were there and had prepared dinner expecting to eat together, but John and Carolyn were nowhere to be found.

“I wasn’t worried at all because anything can happen with John,” he writes.

But at 3 a.m., Kennedy writes, he was awakened by his sister Kerry, who said their cousin’s plane was missing.

“I knew then that John was dead,” he writes.

He looked over to the porch light burning at his cousin’s house and felt empty and sad.

The next day, Sen. Ted Kennedy announced Rory’s wedding had been postponed, as the press gathered at the compound.

“The water was 68 degrees so some people had hope they might still be alive but I had none,” Kennedy writes.

The bickering over the bodies began the next day, July 18, before they were even recovered.

The Bessette family was “very upset” about where the trio would be buried, with the girls’ mother preferring a plot in Greenwich, Conn., close to her home.

“Ann wants them close by and is terrified that the K family might try to spirit them to Brookline,” Kennedy writes.

The Holyhood Cemetery in Brookline is the resting place of Joseph and Rose Kennedy, the family patriarch and matriarch.

After more frantic phone calls, Kennedy says a meeting in New York City was arranged with Ann Freeman and Caroline Kennedy. Instead, Kennedy sent her husband, Ed Schlossberg, along with Vicky Reggie, Ted Kennedy’s wife, RFK Jr. notes.

“All the Bessette family knows that Ed hated Carolyn and did everything in his power to make her life miserable and . . . he bullied, bullied, bullied the shattered grieving mother,” he writes.


USS Dallas (DD-199) - History

Alexander J. Dallas, born 15 May 1791 in Philadelphia, Pa., entered the Navy as a midshipman 22 November 1805. He served with distinction in the War of 1812, the operations against Algiers in 1815, and in the suppression of piracy in the West Indies. He established and commanded the Pensacola Navy Yard from 1832 to 1843. On 16 July 1835 he was ordered to additional duty in command of the West India Squadron in supported General Scott during the war with the Seminole Indians in Florida, rendering such efficient service that the Government gratefully named a fort after him on the eastern coast of Florida. Commanding Pacific Squadron, Captain Dallas died at Callao, Peru, 3 June 1844 in the sloop Vandalia. DD-199 was named in his honor.

Texas. CA-140 and CA-150 were to have honored Sallas,
dp. 1,190, 1. 314'5", b. 31'9", dr. 9'3", s. cpl. 101 a. 4 4", 4 21" tt. cl. Clemson)

Dallas (DD-199) was launched 31 May 1919 by Newport News Shipbuilding Co., Newport News, VA., sponsored by Miss W. D. Strong, great grand-daughter of Captain Dallas and commissioned 29 October 1920, Lieutenant E. H. Roach in temporary command. Lieutenant A. R. Early assumed command 10 November 1920.

Dallas cruised on the east coast, participating in exercises and maneuvers from her base at Charleston S .C. She arrived at Philadelphia 12 April 1922 and was placed out of commission there 26 June. Recommissioned 14 April 1925 Dallas served with various destroyer squadrons, acting as flagship for Squadrons 9 and 1. Until 1931 she cruised on the east coast and the Caribbean, engaging in gunnery exercises, battle torpedo practice, fleet maneuvers and problems participAting in joint Army-Navy exercises, training members of the Naval Reserve and serving as experimental ship at the Naval Torpedo Station, Newport, R.I.

On 9 January 1932 Dallas sailed from Charleston,S.C., for the west coast, arriving at San Diego, 21 March. She operated along the west coast and in the Hawaiian Islands, conducting force practice and tactical exercises and participating in combined fleet exercises.

Dallas sailed from San Diego 9 April 1934 for the Presidential Review of the Fleet in June 1934 at New York City, and tactical exercises on the east coast and in the Caribbean. Returning to San Diego 9 November,Dallas continued to operate in the Pacific until 1938, cruising to Hawaii and Alaska.

Dallas operated in the Canal Zone area between May and November 1938, visiting ports of the Republic of Panama rendering service to Submarine Squadron 3 and making a good-will call at Buenaventura, Colombia. On 17 November she weighed anchor for the east coast arriving at Philadelphia 6 days later. She was again placed out of commission 23 March 1939.

With the outbreak of World War II in Europe, Dallas was recommissioned 26 September 1939 and assigned he Atlantic Fleet, serving as flagship for Destroyer Squadrons 41 and 30. She patrolled the Atlantic coast and conducted training exercises until 7 July 1941 when she got underway for Argentia, Newfoundland, arriving, days later. Between 11 July 1941 and 10 March 1942 she patrolled between Argentia and Halifax and escorted convoys to Reykjavik, Iceland, and Londonderry, Northern Ireland.

From 1 April 1942 to 3 October, Dallas escorted coastal shipping from New York and Norfolk to Florida, Texas, Cuba, Bermuda, and ports in the Caribbean. On 25 October she cleared Norfolk to rendezvous with TF 34 bound for the invasion landings on North Africa. Dallas was to carry a U.S. Army Raider battalion, and land them up the narrow, shallow, obstructed river to take a strategic airport near Port Lyautey, French Morocco. On 10 November she began her run up the Oued Sebou under the masterful guidance of Rene Malavergne, a civilian pilot who was to be the first foreign civilian to receive the Navy Cross. Under fire by cannon and small arms during the entire run, she plowed her way through mud and shallow water, narrowly missing the many sunken ships and other obstructions, and sliced through a cable crossing the river, to land her troops safely just off the airport. Her brilliant success in completing this mission with its many unexpected complications won her the Presidential Unit Citation. On 16 November she departed the African coast for Boston, arriving 26 November.

Dallas had convoy duty between Norfolk, New York and New London, making one voyage to Gibraltar from 3 March to 14 April 1943, until 9 May when she departed Norfolk for Oran, Algeria, arriving 23 May. She patrolled off the North African coast, then on 9 July joined TF 81 for screening duty during the invasion of Scoglitti, Sicily, from 10 to 12 July. She returned to convoy and patrol duties until 7 September when she joined the escort for a convoy bound for the invasion of the Italian mainland. Dallas screened the transport group during the landings at Salerno 9 September, and joined a south-bound convoy 2 days later, rescuing two downed British airmen on her way to Oran. She escorted reinforcements to Salerno, then served on escort and patrol in the Mediterranean until 11 December when she got underway for the east coast, arriving, at Philadelphia on Christmas Eve.

Following a thorough overhaul at Charleston, S.C, Dallas escorted two convoys to North Africa between 23 February and 9 June 1944. On the second voyage the escorts came under attack by enemy torpedo planes on 11 May but successfully defended the convoy Dallas accounted for at least one plane, and damaging others. She served on the east coast on various training and convoy assignments until 7 Juno 1945 when she reported to Philadelphia. Her name was changed to Alexander Dallas 31 March to avoid confusion with the cruiser Dallas then under construction. Alexander Dallas was decommissioned 28 July 1946 and sold for scrap 30 November 1946.

In addition to her Presidential Unit Citation Dallas received four battle stars for World War II service.


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The ultrasound appearances are of testicular malignancy. A right orchiectomy was undertaken.

A right orchiectomy specimen comprises 110 mm of spermatic cord with testis 70 x 45 x 40 mm. The testis is almost completely replaced by a solid white tumor. There are no areas of cystic degeneration…

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Watch the video: Sean Connery and Captain Mankuso of USS Dallas (January 2022).