History Podcasts

July 31, 2015 Day 190 of the Seventh Year - History

July 31, 2015 Day 190 of the Seventh Year - History

President Barack Obama greets recipients of the 2013 Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching prior to joining them for a group photo in the East Room of the White House, July 31, 2015.

10:00AM THE PRESIDENT and VICE PRESIDENT receive the Presidential Daily Briefing

Oval Office


July 31, 2015 Day 190 of the Seventh Year - History

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New in the TVparty Classic TV Blog!
KABC-7 1973 — In Search Of Mysteries with Rod Serling


Television Terrorists
Ripped from the headlines! On Nov. 22, 1987, video hackers managed to override the Chicago PBS station's broadcast of Dr. Who and replace it with a signal beamed from their secret location. Drunk with mad power, this dastardly duo also hacked into a major Chicago commercial station that night for several moments. With one of the world's largest broadcast markets now firmly in their control, what diabolical message would they send?
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What Zoom Meant 50 Years Ago!
"Am I the only lunatic left who remembers the original ZOOM series out of Boston? I think WGBH was the parent station, and everyone wore these (hideous now, cool at the time) purple and orange shirts. "Ubbie talk" came from Zoom, and I was one of many kids on my block who could sing the ZOOM song at the drop of a hat. Please tell me I am not alone in remembering this '70s series."
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New Fall Season - 30 Years Ago
The 1973-74 season had t he worst new show success ratio of any season in television history the 1974-75 rosters performed only slightly better. Just how different was TV three decades ago? Just look at what people were watching - it was the beginning of the end of what is now considered 'classic television. '
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Have a Smoke and Be Somebody!
Cigarette manufacturers advertised widely in the early days of television. They had deep pockets and could afford to gamble on a new medium, footing the bill for a host of early classic programs. Ironically, in just two decades, they were carved away from the medium they helped create.
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Boston Area Educational Kid Shows
WGBH, Channel 2 (still a leading producer of PBS programming) was part of a network (Eastern Educational Network) that showed instructional programming in conjunction with school curricula. Known as "The 21-inch Classroom," the station ran short little programs during school hours, that gave instruction in French lessons ("Parlons Francais," with Madame Anne Slack), science, mathematics and Language Arts.
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How and Why It All Ended For Mayberry
How is it that The Andy Griffith Show has endured on television for almost 45 years? And what is it about the notion of a community like Mayberry that continues to resonate? TVparty looks in depth at how it all ended on the anniversary of the show's cancellation.
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Shrimpenstein
The Shrimpenstein series with Gene Moss and Jim Thurman had that zany little puppet that was built by renowned artiste Wah Chang. Chang was responsible for all sorts of stuff, not the least, the props, weapons, etc in the original Star Trek. Moss and Thurmon later went on (well, not much later) to do a short - lived Johnny Carson-esque talk show on KHJ as well as writing AND voicing the cult favorite Roger Ramjet.
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"Plunk Your Magic Twanger, Froggy!"
"I am looking for a newspaper editorial - it could've also been in a magazine - written about the kid's TV show 'Andy's Gang' in which the writer blames Froggy for causing the protest movement of the 60s. He said Froggy's disrespectful behavior towards adults, which he demonstrated every show, influenced the kids who were watching him and those kids grew up to become the protesting college students of the sixties who likewise showed disrespect towards their elders."
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Winky Dink and You
"I used to watch Winky Dink. I had the kit, but I would intentionally draw the wrong things. When Winky needed a ladder to get out of a hole, I would draw a cover on the hole. When he needed a parachute, I would draw an anvil to pull him down, etc. I would tease my younger sister and tell her that I was making Winky die! Whenever she left the room crying, I would laugh and laugh. Winky was cool."
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Who Killed Elvis?
When Elvis Presley passed away in 1977, the official diagnosis was a heart attack but a special investigation 2 years later revealed a massive coverup by police and medical authorities. This 60 Minutes Australia segment encompasses (and condenses) the 1979 ABC special investigative report by Geraldo Rivera that was the first time most Americans learned that Elvis was a drug addict.
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America's First Lady of Comedy
Carol Burnett won the hearts of TV viewers playing the nervous klutz in dozens of hilarious skits on The Garry Moore Show. She was an instant hit with the home audience, one of the emerging medium's first bright stars.
Each week, hapless Carol would find herself in the most outrageous predicaments. No matter how sketchy the script, the comedienne turned each performance into a farcical romp with her spasmodic interpretations. She quickly became the de-facto star of the program.
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Why Did They Fire TV's Captain Marvel?
"It was a precedent setting case at the Screen Actor's Guild, and Filmation had to pay me for all the shows they didn't use me on, plus residuals. Still, these clown's actions doomed a marvelous show. It wasn't John Davies' fault that he was suddenly thrown into the part of Captain Marvel. It was a rush job. I was fired at 1:00 PM that day, and he was out on the set at 3:00 PM. That's pretty darn fast, I'd say. One of the Execs' reasoning was "The kids'll never know the difference." Riiight. John's a fine actor, but he's no more Captain Marvel than I am Wonder Woman. "
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The Ironic Death of Redd Foxx!
For whatever reason (and the actor's drug and alcohol consumption was surely a factor), the network that capitulated to everyone from Bob Hope to Johnny Carson over the years refused to (or could not) make Redd Foxx happy.
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Saturday Morning Shows 1971
1970 was a very good year for network Saturday morning revenues, so 1971 brought a continuation of the shows that were working - along with remakes of proven series from the past. All three networks started giving in to pressure from parent groups to offer more educational, and less violent programs. For the most part, they are all flops.
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Classic TV on DVD!
Stargate Atlantis, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Dallas, Men Behaving Badly, Captain N, Hootenanny, ER, Wanda Sykes, Adventures of Superman, Pride & Prejudice, Battlestar Galactica, F Troop, Cheyenne, and so many more new to DVD. And they're all deep discounted - for you!
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Saturday Morning TV Shows - 1967
With Batman the hottest show in primetime the networks rolled out an extravaganza of bizarre superheros for their Saturday morning line-up. After The New Beatles and American Bandstand on ABC the network scored a hit with Where the Action Is, a teen music show featuring the hottest acts in the country. With video highlights!
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TV Fall Season : 1972-73
An overview of what folks were watching in 35 years ago with rare video of the hits and flops that marked the beginning of the end of the classic TV era. Do you remember: The Saturday Superstar Movie, ABC Movie of the Week, Captain Noah, the Julie Andrews Hour, Bridget Loves Bernie, Search and The Sixth Sense?
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Classic TV Shows on DVD?
An extensive catalogue of every classic program available on DVD! See what's available today - with big discounts for you!

1980's TV Wrestling - Greats and Near Greats!
NOW WITH ADDED RARE VIDEO!
John Hitchcock's look back at the heart of Mid-Atlantic Wrestling - with grapplers known and unknown. Wahoo McDaniel! Ric Flair! Dusty Rhodes! Jim Cornette! Magnum TA! Buddy "Killer" Austin! Johnny Weaver! Johnny Valentine! Harley Race! Dick Murdock! Jimmy Garvin! Nikita Koloff! Have you ever heard of these guys.
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1980's PUNK ROCK
In the early-eighties, young people in Los Angeles were flocking to makeshift clubs in droves to see new, up and coming bands. Live new music, not DJs, was what they craved. These writings provide a sketchy look at the underground club scene in Los Angeles during the time that groups like X, Missing Persons, The Go-Go's, The Minutemen and Wall of Voodoo entered the public consciousness.
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Taylor Swift beats The Beatles’ UK chart record as Fearless (Taylor's Version) becomes her third Number 1 album in under a year

Taylor Swift rewrites UK Official Chart history this week as her rerecorded album Fearless (Taylor’s Version) lands at Number 1 on the Official Albums Chart, surpassing a long-held chart record by The Beatles.

The Official Charts Company can confirm that by scoring her third chart-topping album in the space of just 259 days (following Folkore on July 31 and Evermore on December 18), Taylor sets a new all-time record for the fastest accumulation of three Number 1 albums ever.

The record was previously held by The Beatles for 54 years – the band notched up a trio of chart-toppers in 364 days between 1965-1966, with Help!, Rubber Soul, and Revolver.


Taylor Swift with her Official Number 1 Album Award from the Official Charts Company for Fearless (Taylor’s Version).

Fearless (Taylor’s Version) racks up just over 21,000 chart sales to become the star’s seventh UK Number 1 album, and outperforms the Number 5 peak of the original, released in 2008. The entry now places Taylor third among female artists with the most chart-topping albums, behind Madonna (12) and Kylie Minogue (8).

Taylor’s other UK Number 1 albums are: Red (2012), 1989 (2014), Reputation (2017), Lover (2019), Folklore (2020), and Evermore (2020). View Taylor’s Official Chart history in full here.

Meanwhile, Ariana Grande’s former chart-topper Positions rebounds 45 places to Number 4 following its release on vinyl, topping the Official Vinyl Albums Chart, and DMX retrospective The Best Of enters at Number 12 one week after the news broke of the rapper’s death.

Further down, there are new entries for French composer Jean-Michel Jarre’s latest album Amazonia (21), and Roadrunner – New Light New Machine by US hip hop boyband Brockhampton (24).


Astronomy Calendar of Celestial Events for Calendar Year 2021

This astronomy calendar of celestial events contains dates for notable celestial events including moon phases, meteor showers, eclipses, oppositions, conjunctions, and other interesting events. Most of the astronomical events on this calendar can be seen with unaided eye, although some may require a good pair of binoculars for best viewing. Many of the events and dates that appear here were obtained from the U.S. Naval Observatory, The Old Farmer's Almanac., and the American Meteor Society. Events on the calendar are organized by date and each is identified with an astronomy icon as outlined below. Please note that all dates and times are given in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) must be converted to your local date and time. You can use the UTC clock widget below to figure out how many hours to add or subtract for your local time.

January 2, 3 - Quadrantids Meteor Shower. The Quadrantids is an above average shower, with up to 40 meteors per hour at its peak. It is thought to be produced by dust grains left behind by an extinct comet known as 2003 EH1, which was discovered in 2003. The shower runs annually from January 1-5. It peaks this year on the night of the 2nd and morning of the 3rd. The waning gibbous moon will block out most of the faintest meteors this year. But if you are patient, you should still be able to catch a few good ones. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Bootes, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

January 13 - New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 05:02 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

January 24 - Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation. The planet Mercury reaches greatest eastern elongation of 18.6 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky. Look for the planet low in the western sky just after sunset.

January 28 - Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 19:18 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Wolf Moon because this was the time of year when hungry wolf packs howled outside their camps. This moon has also been know as the Old Moon and the Moon After Yule.

February 11 - New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 19:08 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

February 27 - Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 08:19 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Snow Moon because the heaviest snows usually fell during this time of the year. Since hunting is difficult, this moon has also been known by some tribes as the Hunger Moon, since the harsh weather made hunting difficult.

March 6 - Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation. The planet Mercury reaches greatest western elongation of 27.3 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky. Look for the planet low in the eastern sky just before sunrise.

March 13 - New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 10:23 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

March 20 - March Equinox. The March equinox occurs at 09:27 UTC. The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world. This is also the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.

March 28 - Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 18:49 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Worm Moon because this was the time of year when the ground would begin to soften and the earthworms would reappear. This moon has also been known as the Crow Moon, the Crust Moon, the Sap Moon, and the Lenten Moon.

April 12 - New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 02:32 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

April 22, 23 - Lyrids Meteor Shower. The Lyrids is an average shower, usually producing about 20 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet C/1861 G1 Thatcher, which was discovered in 1861. The shower runs annually from April 16-25. It peaks this year on the night of the night of the 22nd and morning of the 23rd. These meteors can sometimes produce bright dust trails that last for several seconds. The nearly full moon will be a problem this year. Its glare will block out all but the brightest meteors. But if you are patient you may still be able to catch a few good ones. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Lyra, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

April 27 - Full Moon, Supermoon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 03:33 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Pink Moon because it marked the appearance of the moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the first spring flowers. This moon has also been known as the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Growing Moon, and the Egg Moon. Many coastal tribes called it the Fish Moon because this was the time that the shad swam upstream to spawn. This is also the first of three supermoons for 2021. The Moon will be near its closest approach to the Earth and may look slightly larger and brighter than usual.

May 6, 7 - Eta Aquarids Meteor Shower. The Eta Aquarids is an above average shower, capable of producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak. Most of the activity is seen in the Southern Hemisphere. In the Northern Hemisphere, the rate can reach about 30 meteors per hour. It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet Halley, which has been observed since ancient times. The shower runs annually from April 19 to May 28. It peaks this year on the night of May 6 and the morning of the May 7. The second quarter moon will block out some of the faintest meteors this year. But if you are patient, you should still should be able to catch quite a few good ones. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

May 11 - New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 19:01 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

May 17 - Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation. The planet Mercury reaches greatest eastern elongation of 22 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky. Look for the planet low in the western sky just after sunset.

May 26 - Full Moon, Supermoon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 11:14 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Flower Moon because this was the time of year when spring flowers appeared in abundance. This moon has also been known as the Corn Planting Moon and the Milk Moon. This is also the second of three supermoons for 2021. The Moon will be near its closest approach to the Earth and may look slightly larger and brighter than usual.

May 26 - Total Lunar Eclipse. A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes completely through the Earth's dark shadow, or umbra. During this type of eclipse, the Moon will gradually get darker and then take on a rusty or blood red color. The eclipse will be visible throughout the Pacific Ocean and parts of eastern Asia, Japan, Australia, and western North America. (NASA Map and Eclipse Information)

June 10 - New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 10:54 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

June 10 - Annular Solar Eclipse. An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon is too far away from the Earth to completely cover the Sun. This results in a ring of light around the darkened Moon. The Sun's corona is not visible during an annular eclipse. The path of this eclipse will be confined to extreme eastern Russia, the Arctic Ocean, western Greenland, and Canada. A partial eclipse will be visible in the northeastern United States, Europe, and most of Russia. (NASA Map and Eclipse Information) (NASA Interactive Google Map)

June 21 - June Solstice. The June solstice occurs at 03:21 UTC. The North Pole of the earth will be tilted toward the Sun, which will have reached its northernmost position in the sky and will be directly over the Tropic of Cancer at 23.44 degrees north latitude. This is the first day of summer (summer solstice) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of winter (winter solstice) in the Southern Hemisphere.

June 24 - Full Moon, Supermoon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 18:40 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Strawberry Moon because it signaled the time of year to gather ripening fruit. It also coincides with the peak of the strawberry harvesting season. This moon has also been known as the Rose Moon and the Honey Moon. This is also the last of three supermoons for 2021. The Moon will be near its closest approach to the Earth and may look slightly larger and brighter than usual.

July 4 - Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation. The planet Mercury reaches greatest western elongation of 21.6 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky. Look for the planet low in the eastern sky just before sunrise.

July 10 - New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 01:17 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

July 24 - Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 02:37 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Buck Moon because the male buck deer would begin to grow their new antlers at this time of year. This moon has also been known as the Thunder Moon and the Hay Moon.

July 28, 29 - Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower. The Delta Aquarids is an average shower that can produce up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by debris left behind by comets Marsden and Kracht. The shower runs annually from July 12 to August 23. It peaks this year on the night of July 28 and morning of July 29. The nearly full moon will be a problem this year. It's glare will block block most of the faintest meteors. But if you are patient, you should still be able to catch a few good ones. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

August 2 - Saturn at Opposition. The ringed planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long. This is the best time to view and photograph Saturn and its moons. A medium-sized or larger telescope will allow you to see Saturn's rings and a few of its brightest moons.

August 8 - New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 13:51 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

August 12, 13 - Perseids Meteor Shower. The Perseids is one of the best meteor showers to observe, producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by comet Swift-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1862. The Perseids are famous for producing a large number of bright meteors. The shower runs annually from July 17 to August 24. It peaks this year on the night of August 12 and the morning of August 13. The waxing crescent moon will set early in the evening, leaving dark skies for what should be an excellent show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Perseus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

August 19 - Jupiter at Opposition. The giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long. This is the best time to view and photograph Jupiter and its moons. A medium-sized telescope should be able to show you some of the details in Jupiter's cloud bands. A good pair of binoculars should allow you to see Jupiter's four largest moons, appearing as bright dots on either side of the planet.

August 22 - Full Moon, Blue Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 12:02 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Sturgeon Moon because the large sturgeon fish of the Great Lakes and other major lakes were more easily caught at this time of year. This moon has also been known as the Green Corn Moon and the Grain Moon. Since this is the third of four full moons in this season, it is known as a blue moon. This rare calendar event only happens once every few years, giving rise to the term, “once in a blue moon.” There are normally only three full moons in each season of the year. But since full moons occur every 29.53 days, occasionally a season will contain 4 full moons. The extra full moon of the season is known as a blue moon. Blue moons occur on average once every 2.7 years.

September 7 - New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 00:52 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

September 14 - Neptune at Opposition. The blue giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long. This is the best time to view and photograph Neptune. Due to its extreme distance from Earth, it will only appear as a tiny blue dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.

September 14 - Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation. The planet Mercury reaches greatest eastern elongation of 26.8 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky. Look for the planet low in the western sky just after sunset.

September 20 - Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 23:54 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Corn Moon because the corn is harvested around this time of year. This moon is also known as the Harvest Moon. The Harvest Moon is the full moon that occurs closest to the September equinox each year.

September 22 - September Equinox. The September equinox occurs at 19:11 UTC. The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world. This is also the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.

October 6 - New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 11:05 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

October 7 - Draconids Meteor Shower. The Draconids is a minor meteor shower producing only about 10 meteors per hour. It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet 21P Giacobini-Zinner, which was first discovered in 1900. The Draconids is an unusual shower in that the best viewing is in the early evening instead of early morning like most other showers. The shower runs annually from October 6-10 and peaks this year on the the night of the 7th. This year, the nearly new moon will leave dark skies for what should be an excellent show. Best viewing will be in the early evening from a dark location far away from city lights. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Draco, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

October 20 - Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 14:57 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Hunters Moon because at this time of year the leaves are falling and the game is fat and ready to hunt. This moon has also been known as the Travel Moon and the Blood Moon.

October 21, 22 - Orionids Meteor Shower. The Orionids is an average shower producing up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Halley, which has been known and observed since ancient times. The shower runs annually from October 2 to November 7. It peaks this year on the night of October 21 and the morning of October 22. The full moon will be a problem this year for the Orionids. Its glare will block out all but the brightest meteors. But if you are patient, you should still be able to catch a few good ones. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Orion, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

October 25 - Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation. The planet Mercury reaches greatest western elongation of 18.4 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky. Look for the planet low in the eastern sky just before sunrise.

October 29 - Venus at Greatest Eastern Elongation. The planet Venus reaches greatest eastern elongation of 47 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Venus since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky. Look for the bright planet in the western sky after sunset.

November 4 - New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 21:15 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

November 4, 5 - Taurids Meteor Shower. The Taurids is a long-running minor meteor shower producing only about 5-10 meteors per hour. It is unusual in that it consists of two separate streams. The first is produced by dust grains left behind by Asteroid 2004 TG10. The second stream is produced by debris left behind by Comet 2P Encke. The shower runs annually from September 7 to December 10. It peaks this year on the the night of November 4. The new moon will leave dark skies this year for what should be an excellent show. Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Taurus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

November 5 - Uranus at Opposition. The blue-green planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long. This is the best time to view Uranus. Due to its distance, it will only appear as a tiny blue-green dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.

November 17, 18 - Leonids Meteor Shower. The Leonids is an average shower, producing up to 15 meteors per hour at its peak. This shower is unique in that it has a cyclonic peak about every 33 years where hundreds of meteors per hour can be seen. That last of these occurred in 2001. The Leonids is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tempel-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1865. The shower runs annually from November 6-30. It peaks this year on the night of the 17th and morning of the 18th. Unfortunately the nearly full moon will dominate the sky this year, blocking all but the brightest meteors. But if you are patient, you should still be able to catch a few good ones. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Leo, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

November 19 - Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 08:59 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Beaver Moon because this was the time of year to set the beaver traps before the swamps and rivers froze. It has also been known as the Frosty Moon and the Dark Moon.

November 19 - Partial Lunar Eclipse. A partial lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth's partial shadow, or penumbra, and only a portion of it passes through the darkest shadow, or umbra. During this type of eclipse a part of the Moon will darken as it moves through the Earth's shadow. The eclipse will be visible throughout most of eastern Russia, Japan, the Pacific Ocean, North America, Mexico, Central America, and parts of western South America. (NASA Map and Eclipse Information)

December 4 - New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This phase occurs at 07:44 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

December 4 - Total Solar Eclipse. A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon completely blocks the Sun, revealing the Sun's beautiful outer atmosphere known as the corona. The path of totality will for this eclipse will be limited to Antarctica and the southern Atlantic Ocean. A partial eclipse will bee visible throughout much of South Africa. (NASA Map and Eclipse Information) (Interactive NASA Google)

December 13, 14 - Geminids Meteor Shower. The Geminids is the king of the meteor showers. It is considered by many to be the best shower in the heavens, producing up to 120 multicolored meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by debris left behind by an asteroid known as 3200 Phaethon, which was discovered in 1982. The shower runs annually from December 7-17. It peaks this year on the night of the 13th and morning of the 14th. The waxing gibbous moon will block out most of the fainter meteors this year. But the Geminids are so numerous and bright that this could still be a good show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Gemini, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

December 19 - Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 04:37 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Cold Moon because this is the time of year when the cold winter air settles in and the nights become long and dark. This moon has also been known as the Long Nights Moon and the Moon Before Yule.

December 21 - December Solstice. The December solstice occurs at 15:50 UTC. The South Pole of the earth will be tilted toward the Sun, which will have reached its southernmost position in the sky and will be directly over the Tropic of Capricorn at 23.44 degrees south latitude. This is the first day of winter (winter solstice) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of summer (summer solstice) in the Southern Hemisphere.

December 21, 22 - Ursids Meteor Shower. The Ursids is a minor meteor shower producing about 5-10 meteors per hour. It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tuttle, which was first discovered in 1790. The shower runs annually from December 17-25. It peaks this year on the the night of the 21st and morning of the 22nd. The nearly full moon will be a problem this year, blocking all but the brightest meteors. But if you are patient enough, you may still be able to catch a few good ones. Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Ursa Minor, but can appear anywhere in the sky.


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4 August 1914

Britain declares war on Germany in response to the invasion of Belgium

When Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia in July, Serbia's ally Russia mobilised its army. Austria-Hungary's ally, Germany, in turn declared war on Russia. Russia's alliance with France now threatened Germany with war on two fronts. Germany acted to quickly neutralise France by a well-planned surprise invasion through neutral Belgium - the 'Schlieffen Plan'. Britain, as guarantor of Belgian neutrality, told Germany to withdraw. The ultimatum expired on 4 August and Britain duly declared war.


United States - NASA Launches Ulysses Probe

The joint ESA / NASA space probe "Ulysses" was launched.

More Information for Ulysses Probe

1. The Ulysses space craft was launched in 1990 and was a joint effort between the ESA and NASA.

2. The probe’s mission was studying the Sun and solar system’s magnetic field, also known as the heliosphere.

3. The European Space Agency’s (ESA) space probe “Ulysses” reached its southern most latitude in its orbit around the Sun during September of 1994.

4. The Ulysses mission was only expected to last for five years but it continued for about eighteen years and ended in 2009.


Inpatient PPS PC Pricer

Providers and other payers use PC Pricer applications to estimate Medicare payments. Over the next year, CMS will stop producing new versions of the downloadable PC Pricers and issue them as web-based applications.

The IPPS Web Pricer may be accessed via the following link: https://webpricer.cms.gov/#/

Please Note: The 'HMO paid claim' field is a new feature that will be added to a future release of the IPPS Web Pricer. In the interim, the FY 2021 IPPS PC Pricer can be used to access this field.

For the best user experience, access the IPPS Web Pricer through Google Chrome. You may also access it through Microsoft Edge, or Mozilla Firefox. Microsoft Internet Explorer is not supported.

We need your feedback, please email [email protected], with the subject line "IPPS Web Pricer Feedback" with your comments or suggestions for the new IPPS Web Pricer.

The Social Security Amendments of 1983 (Public Law 98-21) established the Prospective Payment System (PPS) for hospital inpatient services provided to Medicare beneficiaries. Under this system, a hospital is paid a fixed amount for each patient discharged in a particular treatment category or Diagnosis Related Group (DRG). This fixed amount is intended to cover the cost of treating a typical patient for a particular DRG. The PPS Pricer software, which will be released on a quarterly basis, calculates discharges from October 1 through September 30 for a given fiscal year.

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Life Path Number 6

As a Life Path Number 6, you should keep an eye on yourself as you may become self-righteous and critical of others. Because you are so giving you might have a tendency to become a slave to others and neglect your own needs in the process. The word domestic most likely describes you well, and one job you would love is being a stay at home parent.

Because you thrive on supporting others you may sometimes find it difficult to find a balance between helping and meddling. You may also become an enabler for someone who needs taking care of in a relationship, or with a child, and not allow them to experience life or learn its lessons. People born on the Sixth path are often described as magnetic, as people are often drawn to them, and their moods can affect the room.

Your tendency is to be a humanitarian and you feel a genuine devotion to the welfare of your fellow human beings, but you must be careful of putting people on pedestals, as they often have a tendency to topple.


Global Health Expenditure Database

WHO works collaboratively with Member States and updates the database annually using available data such as health accounts studies and government expenditure records. Where necessary, modifications and estimates are made to ensure the comprehensiveness and consistency of the data across countries and years. GHED is the source of the health expenditure data republished by the World Bank and the WHO Global Health Observatory.

To mark Universal Health Coverage Day in December 2020, WHO has released new data and will soon publish the report “Global Spending on Health: Weathering the Storm”. It examines how countries were progressing towards financing UHC prior to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, global spending on health continued to rise, albeit at a slower rate in recent years. 2018 was the first year in five years in which global spending on health grew slower than GDP. The report also shows that out-of-pocket spending continues to be a major component of health spending in low- and middle-income countries. Furthermore, this report shows that external aid, which peaked in 2014, has been increasingly directed towards lower-middle income countries. In 2018, the amount of external aid absorbed by lower-middle income countries surpassed that of low-income countries.
The report examines the potential effects on health expenditure of the COVID-19 pandemic, given its devastating impact on health and economies across the globe. The report also features dedicated chapters on lower income countries and disease/programme expenditure. The former examines health spending patterns in a subset of countries which face important macroeconomic vulnerabilities, high levels of poverty, and are lagging behind in Universal Health Coverage (UHC) indicators. In these settings, out-of-pocket spending is larger than government spending and the governments’ priority to health has been decreasing over time. The disease/programme expenditure chapter studies spending on infectious disease, NCDs, reproductive health and immunization, as well as the revenue sources for each.

Alongside this new report and data, we are also pleased to announce the update of interactive visualisations of health spending for each country. In this section, you will be able to view, download and print individual country profiles.

In the documentation center, you will find the December 2020 country release note, as well as complementary technical notes, methodology guidelines, global, regional and country reports on health expenditure, and metadata documentation.


Watch the video: Today in History for September 1st (January 2022).